Blog

The term “grinding” hardly sounds like a meticulous and precise process. It calls to mind images of rough grinding wheels taking huge chunks out of some poor material. There are different types of grinding, however, and precision grinding makes it possible to make a variety of products that would be much more difficult to make with other processes.

What is Precision Grinding?

This process allows metal parts with very close tolerances to be fabricated or finished. Precision grinding techniques include cylindrical grinding and surface grinding (also known as Blanchard or Mattison grinding). Grinding consists of using a spinning wheel made of bonded abrasive particles to remove material from the piece being worked, making it conform to specs.

The grinding technician decides which grinding method is the right one for a particular part, based on the specifications and holding requirements for the piece. The technician will also choose the appropriate tool to give the surface of the piece being ground the correct shape, size and texture. Some factories have facilities to do grinding of this kind onsite, but in most cases they would be better off bringing their grinding work to the experts at Minnesota Grinding to take advantage of our advanced equipment and expert technicians.

Products Made with Precise Grinding

Tiny metal parts such as those found in most modern electronics often require a precision grind. Some larger parts that require tight tolerances are also made with precision grinding. Components for medical devices, aerospace instruments, scientific instruments and bladed implements all require this type of grinding. Obviously, there is little margin for error in these industries and devices, so absolute perfection is required from each grind. Minnesota Grinding can grind any of these components and more to your specifications.

Alternatives to Grinding

There are alternatives to precision grinding, but they are not as cost-effective or precise. Laser cutting, for instance, can give a very precise cut, but it is an expensive process that requires equally expensive equipment. Sawing and boring are also possible alternatives, but they do not allow for the tight tolerances of a precision grind. Hard turning on a lathe is also sometimes used instead of grinding, but it often requires prior heating of the metal where thermal stability becomes an issue nor does it provide a smooth finish.

Our goal is always to exceed your expectations by focusing on quality and delivery. Contact us about our precision grinding capabilities today.